Live Broadcast Today

SeaWorld animal care experts have helped more than 22,000 animals in need over the past four decades, many of which have been manatees. Today [Thursday, July 18], four of those special creatures will be released LIVE at 10 a.m. ET! Pipsqueak, Braille, Nitty and Asaka will return to the waters of Eddy Creek in Brevard County, Florida and for the first time SeaWorld will broadcast the event! Animal enthusiasts from around the world can watch the event as it’s happening (Click here).

Manatees in rehabilitation pools at SeaWorld, Orlando

Manatees in rehabilitation pools at SeaWorld, Orlando

Braille, Nitty and Pipsqueak suffered mild cold stress last December after getting caught in the mosquito impoundment in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge.  They are doing so well with rehabilitation, they’re packing up and getting ready to roll!

Impoundments are earthen dikes that allow control over how
much water stands in the area to limit the number of mudflats,
so mosquitoes have fewer places to lay eggs and breed.

This past March, Asaka suffered from buoyancy issues which led to her rescue by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) from the Indian River in Merritt Island, Florida. While at SeaWorld, her buoyancy issues were resolved.

Buoyancy is the ability to float or rise when submerged in a liquid. Manatees
do not have swim bladders, and use their lungs to maintain “neutral
buoyancy” and their horizontal position while they graze.
Without this ability, they cannot properly feed.

Cleared for release, the four manatees will be fitted with a satellite tag that will allow the FWC to monitor the animals’ movements to ensure their success.

SeaWorld’s animal rescue team, along with Canaveral National Seashore and FWC team members, will participate in the release. Tune in, or follow on FaceBook, Twitter and Instagram.

If you see injured marine animal, you can help by calling the
FWC hotline at 1(888) 404-3922 or by dialing *FWC on a cellular device.

Manatee Born at SeaWorld Orlando

A sonogram taken July 20 clearly shows the calf’s spine and a heartbeat.

The pregnant manatee rescued in Merritt Island, FL on June 8 (read about it here) gave birth to a healthy calf July 18, 2012, sometime between 3 and 6 a.m. Both mother and baby are said to be doing well. The newborn is healthy, nursing and swimming close to its mother. SeaWorld’s Animal Care team has the pair under 24-hour surveillance.

The new baby gives its mom a little kiss!

The newborn calf sticks its tongue out, probably still “rooting.”

New calf bonding with mom in a back area pool at SeaWorld, Orlando.

Rescued Manatee is Pregnant

Pedro Ramos-Navarrate, Supervisor of Animal Care, and SeaWorld Animal Care Experts steady the female manatee in the rescue boat.

Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission rescue team members work alongside SeaWorld rescue and rehabilitation workers to transport the injured female manatee rescued near Cocoa Beach, FL.

The 10-foot manatee rescued on June 8 from Sykes Creek in Merritt Island, FL from crab trap line injuries has been determined to be pregnant by SeaWorld animal care experts.

After assessing and treating her injuries to her right flipper, the 1,400-pound adult was given an ultrasound which confirmed the animal care expert’s suspicion (based on her large size). Manatees usually have a 12 month gestation period, though it is unknown exactly how far along she is at present.

Stranded Baby Dolphin Rescued by SeaWorld’s Animal Care Team

A baby dolphin, believed to be just 5 days old and with his umbilical cord still attached, was rescued Sunday, May 20, 2012 near Three Sisters Island in Volusia County. The male calf weighed slightly less than 35 pounds and was found in shallow waters under a mangrove.

Initial tests revealed no major health issues, but SeaWorld’s animal team will manually tube-feed the newborn every two hours. Dolphin calves usually nurse for 12 to 18 months.

“Dolphin calves typically nurse from their mother until they are 12 to 18 months old.”

Pedro Ramos-Navarrate, Supervisor of Animal Care, along with SeaWorld’s animal team are working tirelessly to ensure the calf continues to grow and thrive.

This successful rescue was the result of a team of Animal experts and volunteers. The Hubbs-SeaWorld Research Institute initially examined the dolphin. Once NOAA Fisheries Service authorized his rescue, SeaWorld’s animal rescue team brought the baby dolphin to SeaWorld for care.

SeaWorld’s animal rescue team is on call 24/7 to save and care for injured, orphaned or ill animals. This is the first bottlenose dolphin to be rescued this year.

SeaWorld Cares Beach Clean Up Saturday, May 19

Become an everyday hero by joining SeaWorld Cares outreach to celebrate, connect and care for animals and the environment we all share during a beach cleanup at a prime turtle nesting location, Cherie Down Park (8492 Ridgewood Avenue, Cape Canaveral, FL 32920). Beach cleanup will be from 9 a.m. – 12 p.m. Remember to wear close-toed shoes and hats. Be sure to apply sunscreen and bug spray. Parking is free and there is a family picnic shelter and bathroom nearby. Please RSVP at PassRSVP@seaworld.com. Please include your name, number of attendees and email address. Please also include attendee(s) T-shirt size in the email (Adult – M, L or XL and Youth – S, M or L). Participants under 16 years old must be accompanied by an adult/guardian. All participants will need to sign a waiver/photo release.

Directions: East on 528 turns into A1A and you are in Cape Canaveral. Make a left at light on Central (McDonald’s), and continue straight -east- thru next traffic light, at end of road, make right on Ridgewood (park is opposite Capeview Elementary). If you pass Washington you have gone too far.

Loggerhead Turtle Who Swallowed a Hook is Released Today Thanks to SeaWorld

X-Ray shows 4" hook in Loggerhead's throat.

Four weeks ago a sub-adult Loggerhead turtle was found by biologists from the Inwater Research Group near the St. Lucie Power Plant in St. Lucie County, Florida. The 100-pound turtle was taken to SeaWorld, Orlando on February 26 with transport assistance from Inwater volunteers.

Initial tests, bloodwork, and x-rays confirmed the need for immediate surgery. The turtle had ingested a 4-inch-long fish hook.

Senior Veterinarian Dr. Lara Croft, one of three SeaWorld Orlando staff veterinarians, performed the surgery. It was one of the largest SeaWorld veterinarians have removed. Showing remarkable resilience, the turtle has made a quick recovery.

Dr. Croft watches on as aquarium staff members prepare the sea turtle for the x-ray procedure.

After a few short weeks of round-the-clock care, the turtle was deemed fit for release earlier this week.

This morning, Dan Conklin, aquarium supervisor at Seaworld, and dedicated staffers carefully loaded up the turtle for the ride to the beach before 8 a.m.

At Lori Wilson Park, Cocoa Beach, the loggerhead got one last lift from his friends at SeaWorld as they carried it from the transport vehicle to the water.

Peter Pan (as I’ve affectionately dubbed for his Hook-beating ways) moved steadily toward the water with many well-wishers around. At a little after 9 a.m. flippers could be seen darting through the waves as SeaWorld again helped an animal in need. More than 20,000 animals have been rescued by SeaWorld experts. Their hard-working animal rescue team is on call 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Peter Pan makes way for the surf.

Help a Turtle Out:

J-shaped hooks are easy for sea life to swallow, which is why anglers are urged to use the new “circle” hooks which are less likely to be ingested. Protect this and other threatened species by properly disposing of all trash, and securing fishing line that can also cause harm to our ocean friends.

Love me, and all my Loggerhead turtle friends and sea buddies, by being responsible when you're on, or around, waterways.

Celebrate the release by doing a Loggerhead craft!

Loggerhead Turtle Rehabilitated and Soon To Be Released Thanks to SeaWorld

This is one of the many turtles rescued and rehabilitated by the SeaWorld team.

I’m so excited that the sea turtle that had a 4-inch-long hook in its throat will be returning home to the waters of Cocoa Beach soon! Thank you SeaWorld and Inwater Research Group for finding and taking care of this beautiful animal and to the vets who removed the hook and helped it make a quick recovery!

SeaWorld Rehab Teams Are Ready to Roll when and where an animal needs them.

“The turtle, a sub-adult weighing approximately 100 pounds, was rescued from the intake canal at the St. Lucie Power Plant in St. Lucie County, Fla. The animal arrived at SeaWorld Orlando February 26 and immediately underwent surgery following x-rays and blood work procedures. Vets removed a 4 inch-long fish hook, and after a speedy recovery, the turtle is now ready to be released back into the wild.

The loggerhead was found by the Inwater Research Group – an organization committed to the research and conservation of coastal species and habitats – who also assisted in the animal’s transport.

According to SeaWorld veterinarians, the fishing hook was one of the largest the team has removed to date. To help protect this threatened species, make sure fishing line and all trash is disposed of properly. When fishing, use new “circle” hooks – turtles are less likely to swallow the circle-shaped hooks than traditional J-shaped, which cause suffocation or internal bleeding when swallowed. Also, if a sea turtle’s nest is seen, please contact authorities.

This year, SeaWorld Orlando has rescued nine sea turtles. For 45 years, SeaWorld Parks & Entertainment has helped animals in need — ill, injured and orphaned. More than 20,000 animals have been rescued by our experts.‪ SeaWorld’s animal rescue team is on call 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. ‪”

Sea Otter Awareness Week Gets Boost from the SeaWorld and Busch Gardens Conservation Fund

Aside

This week, September 25 to October 1, is Sea Otter Awareness Week. Defenders of Wildlife, with support from the SeaWorld & Busch Gardens Conservation Fund, is educating the public on conservation programs and education on the sea otter’s role in nearshore marine ecosystems on California’s Central Coast.

Sea Otters are Playful and FUN to watch!

Fun Facts about California Sea Otters:

  • Hair Raising! They have extremely dense fur with over 1,000,000 hairs per square inch
  • Hungry! They eat about 25 to 30% of their body weight every day
  • Handy! They use rocks to pry open shells

SeaWorld San Diego is home to some very playful Sea Otters at Rocky Point Preserve. They were originally stranded and were rescued as part of the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Sea Otter Research and Conservation program.

Adopt a Sea Otter

You can help save California Sea Otters by participating in the various programs and initiatives sponsored by Defenders of Wildlife. You can even “adopt” a sea otter! For more information, visit: http://www.saveseaotters.org.

For more than 40 years, SeaWorld Parks & Entertainment – encompassing SeaWorld, Busch Gardens and Discovery Cove – have initiated and supported wildlife conservation, research, and education at home and around the world.

Honor someone you love, or donate “just because” to the SeaWorld Busch Gardens Conservation Fund.

You can also read more on SeaWorld’s blog.

Get the Sensation at One Ocean at SeaWorld Orlando

SeaWorld’s new killer whale show was unveiled recently with a splash! (Understatement of the year!) Crowds, as you can imagine for opening day, were heavy, but we managed to get a seat. (We joking referred to ourselves as “ceiling fans,” we were SO far up in the stadium.) In our subsequent visits we’ve made it a point to arrive 30 to 40 minutes early to get the up-close-and-personal seats. Why? Well, first because it’ breathtaking being close to the whales, and second because you “get the sensation.”

Young children are naturally curious. Talking about events like this by discussing the senses is a super introduction to not only science, but language arts. And they learning to be good observers and communicators, all while recounting a fun, FUN show.

We started with the five “primary” (or most-known) senses.

What did we hear? Uplifting and up-tempo music, of course, but we also heard the sound of water splashing as the whales jumped out of the water, then BOOM landed again. We heard the crowd giggling and screaming when they were hit with the splashes and the water crashing on the stadium seats.

What did we see? Majestic, huge!, shiny black-and-white beauties, caring trainers, TONS of water, huge screens that moved, lots and lots of people having the time of their lives. We pointed out some of the whale’s anatomy: rostrum, fluke, blow hole, dorsal fin and eyespot. And look, up in the sky… it’s a bird. But he’s not part of the show! It’s just a white feathered friend trying to sneak a snack.

How about feeling? Did we feel anything… unusual? Well, when we sat up in the upper balcony we felt the smoothness of the seat underneath us and the gritty concrete of the stadium walls. Normal stuff. On subsequent visits (when we sat in the Zone), however, we also felt wet… REALLY wet as we felt the splash from the pool!

One Ocean

Get the Sensation of Being SPLASHED

We smelled snacks, and the faint smell of fish when the wind caught it “just so,” but didn’t taste anything until the show was over and we re-filled our popcorn bucket (you certainly don’t want a full bucket getting soggy in the show, now do you?).

There are more than five senses. It’s actually closer to 20. One of the many “lesser-known” senses we described is thermoception which, to my young child, we called hot/cold. One minute we were “enjoying” (ahem) the Florida heat and then WHAM! a wall of extremely cold water made our skin shiver as goose bumps appeared.

Our balance helped us maneuver up and down the steps and kept us from toppling off our seats when we were hit with “the wave.” We could tell time was passing as we waited for the show to begin and were impatient for it to start. (And, curiously, time seemed to go quicker during all the fun!)

Describing what we sensed not only helped fix the memories in our minds, but helped my son use his exploding language skills.

One Ocean was fun. It was thrilling. It was (dare I say it?!) SENSEational! And it was, yet again, an educational experience for the whole family, cleverly disguised as a whale of a day.

On Their Own, Now… SeaWorld Releases Their 1000th Rescued Sea Turtle

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The other day my son fell asleep on my chest. This usually high-test, fast motion, ALL boy 4-year-old for a few, brief moments let me hold him and nurture him “up close and personal.” After a stretch here, a yawn … Continue reading